We Need More Men Like Amos

Text: Amos 1:1

Amos Was a Regular Guy

  • He was a sheepherder (Amos 1:1) — common occupation
  • He was “not a prophet” (Amos 7:14) — he certainly prophesied (7:15), but was not formally recognized or received wages as a prophet
  • He was not a “son of a prophet” (Amos 7:14) — he received no formal training for the role of a prophet
  • God needs regular people to do his work — those who do not want to be just “regular people” will not come to Christ (1 Corinthians 1:26-29)

Amos Supported Himself

  • Amaziah threatened Amos (Amos 7:12-13) — his message was not welcome; if Amos wanted to receive support (“eat bread“), he would have to go elsewhere
  • Prophets at this time were often supported by the government (1 Kings 18:19) — Amos wasn’t a prophet in this sense, he was a herdsman (Amos 7:14); his livelihood wasn’t threatened
  • Important for preachers to be able to support themselves (Acts 18:1-5) — when support does not exist for truth teachers, there is a temptation to compromise when a preacher is unwilling/unable to support himself (2 Timothy 4:2-5)
  • Important that we work to support ourselves (2 Thessalonians 3:6-10; 1 Timothy 5:8) — if possible, don’t rely on someone else; do not “eat… bread without paying for it” (2 Thessalonians 3:8)
  • Some are unable to support themselves & God has made provisions for them — but those who are able to support themselves should do so rather than try to get something for nothing

Amos Spoke the Words of God

  • Amos revealed God’s word (Amos 7:15) — we must speak God’s word today as it has been revealed (1 Peter 3:15; 4:11)
  • Amos spoke without fear — when threatened he didn’t back down (Amos 7:15; cf. Matthew 10:28)
  • Amos spoke without compromise — he refused to change an unpopular message (cf. Galatians 1:6-9)
  • Amos spoke without “political correctness” — was not afraid to offend people with God’s word (Amos 4:1; 7:17) like so many are today

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